What a timely message to send out before you venture forth tonight to enjoy the holiday! Yet, as you prepare for your special festivities, we wouldn’t be your health partner if we didn’t remind you that “all things in moderation” is a great policy for enjoying life and choosing health at the same time.

Candy

It’s Halloween! Lots of costumes and parties… and lots of candy. Candy is not dangerous, but too much candy can be unhealthy.

How can you exercise some moderation? Maybe you don’t buy quite as many bags of candy. Maybe hand out just one piece to your Trick-or-Treaters. While the king-size bar makes you popular in the neighborhood for a day, those big candy bars are packed with fat and sugar. Smaller is better for everyone.

For those with kids, let them collect as much candy as they want, but maybe it only stays around for a week or so. After a week, dispose of leftover candy. You can also limit candy to 1-2 pieces per day. Remember to brush those teeth after eating candy and before bed.

Grown-ups can enjoy Halloween festivities too, but enjoy wisely.

Parties and Alcohol

For adults, moderation is also the key! Enjoy a few pieces of chocolate, but not too many. Also, careful with the alcohol! Alcohol has empty calories and impairs judgment. Never drive after drinking alcohol.  Consider taking a cab to and from your Halloween costume party.

Keep it safe and healthy.

It’s dark out there…

It gets dark early on Halloween (sun sets at 5:55pm). While it is important to let your kids have some independence on their Trick-or-Treat sojourn, safety is first.

For little kids, waiting on the curb is great; for a bit older kids, waiting at the end of the block is an option for providing that balance between independence and safety.  If you are driving, please slow down and be aware there are lots of kids out in the streets and crosswalks. And get some reflective tape for your little one so they show up in the dark.

Halloween is a delightful holiday full of fun and make-believe. Keep it safe and healthy. Talk to your primary care provider about other healthy eating choices for you and your kids.